Child Guardians, Inc.

If you suspect or know of any child who is being harmed, call theFlorida Abuse Hotline at (800) 962-2873 or TDD (800) 453-5145.
If you see a child in immediate danger, call 911.

Learn More

How To Help


The mission of Child Guardians, Inc. is to help abused, neglected, or abandoned children through its direct funding of children’s needs, and through support of organizations serving these children in the Florida counties of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton.

We dedicate this web site to the more than 1 million children and youth who are victims of maltreatment each year. Many victims don’t receive help because they are not reported to the system. These abused and neglected children span all ages, races, religions , and socio-economic backgrounds.

Child maltreatment includes actions that result in imminent risk of serious harm, death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation of a child under age 18 by a parent or caretaker. This is a CALL TO ACTION!

Using the resources presented here, educate yourself, and “one child at a time”, assist us in providing funding for the unmet needs of our most vulnerable children.

Here are a few ways you can help us ensure that achieve those goals.


Keep In Touch

Register to receive updated information about Child Guardians, Inc. CLICK HERE

Child Guardians, Inc.
P.O. Box 9526
Pensacola, FL. 32513
childguardians@beaguardian.org

Parent/Guardian & Volunteer Resources


Parent/Guardian & Volunteer Resources


National Kids Count Data For Florida & US Web Version

Statistics related to the population of the four counties served, types of maltreatment, and ages of children who are victims of maltreatment.

WEB SITES of High Interest for Child Abuse, Neglect and Abandonment:

  1. Florida’s Center for the Advancement of Child Welfare Practice:  www.centerforchildwelfare.org
  2. Florida Kids Count Report - FloridaKidsCount.org
  3. National Center for Child Welfare  (Statistics related child welfare by State)

Topic #1 – Local Resource Listings

List of Local Human Service Resources for our Four-county Area :(Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Florida)

  1. Street Survival Guide  (This is the latest version of local resources for Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida, collated by the EscaRosa Homeless Coalition.  (Choose the Resources Tab)
  2. Local Resources in Okaloosa and Walton Counties
  3. Adoption Agencies in Circuit One (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties in Florida)

TOPIC #2:  Transitioning Youth

Middle and High School plus Post Secondary Preparation

  1. Resources for “Planning for High School and Beyond” on the Education Resource Page <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/educrsrc/Forms/AllItems.aspx> .
  2. Resources for a successful transition to adulthood on the Independent Living Resource Page <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/il/default.aspx> .
  3. Grants and Scholarship sites
  4.  National Foster Parent Association College Scholarship <http://www.collegescholarships.org/scholarships/foster.htm>
  5.  Foster Care to Success <http://fc2success.org/what-we-do/scholarships-and-grants/>
  6.  Various Scholarships for Young Adults previously in Care <http://scholarships.fastweb.com/u-students-who-received-foster-care>
  7. Permanency Pact: Life-long, kin-like connections between a youth and a supportive adult <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/indliv/Permanency%20Pact.pdf
  8. At what age should a foster youth choose an educational goal/plan? What should be included and can it be changed? <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/flcwp1kbfaqcmhomeaspx/cmn6.aspx>
  9. What liability does a foster parent have in allowing a foster youth to participate in age appropriate activities? <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/flcwp1kbfaqcmhomeaspx/cmn5.aspx>
  10. More Normalcy resources <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/il/normalcy/Forms/AllItems.aspx>
  11. High School Graduation Party on a Budget <http://www.ehow.com/how_4900703_high-school-graduation-party-budget.html>
  12. How to Plan for Prom on a Budget <http://www.ehow.com/how_2276499_plan-prom-budget.html>
  13. Nights of Safety: Prom and Beyond <http://www.communityparentcenter.org/news/news-prom-night-safety-car-drive.php>
  14. Prom Safety (SADD) <http://www.sadd.org/promtoolkit.htm>
  15. More Social, Education and Life Skills Resources on Youth Space page <http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/kb/resource/YouthSpace.aspx>

Topic #3 – Academic Resources for Parents/Caregivers and Volunteers

  1. 100 tips for Parents and Caregivers
  2. Summer Reading Activity Kit
  3. Family Fun Reading Activities
  4. The Khan Academy – on-line tutoring source (FREE ON-LINE TUTORING) on a wide variety of topics for children and adults)
  5. Family Fun Reading Activities (Reading activities for all ages from the Florida Department of Education)

Laws, Definitions, Signs & Symptoms of Child Abuse and Neglect


The following information is specific to the State of Florida.  If you reside in another state, you can utilize a search engine to find specific information related to your State Statutes.  For example, search, “Child abuse and neglect laws in Georgia”.

Abuse Hotline | Florida Department of Children and Families

www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline

Any allegations a child was abused or neglected by a caregiver will be  transferred to the appropriate local law enforcement agency where the child lives.

  1. 827.03 – Statutes & Constitution :View Statutes : Online Sunshine

    www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?…

    Florida Legislature

    Online Sunshine Logo. Official Internet Site of the Florida Legislature  827.03 Abuse, aggravated abuse, and neglect of a child; penalties.—. (1) DEFINITIONS.

  2. 39.201 – Statutes & Constitution :View Statutes : Online Sunshine

    www.leg.state.fl.us/statuTes/index.cfm?…

    Florida Legislature

    Official Internet Site of the Florida Legislature  39.201 Mandatory reports of child abuse, abandonment, or neglect; mandatory reports of death; central abuse 

  3. [PDF]

    Definitions from Florida Statutes Chapter 39 (b) “Child abuse 

    qol.nova.edu/pdf/DefinitionsfromFloridaStatutesChapter39.pdf

    (b) “Child abuse” means abandonment, abuse, harm, mental injury, neglect,  childor, in the absence of a parent or legal custodian, the caregiver, while being 

  4. [PDF]

    DCF Reporting Abuse of Children and Vulnerable Adults - Florida 

    www.dcf.state.fl.us/programs/abuse/publications/mandatedreporters.pdf

    The name of any person reporting child abuse, neglect or abandonment,  protective services, the Florida Abuse Hotline, law enforcement, the Child Protection.

  5. Chapter 827 Section 03 – 2011 Florida Statutes – The Florida Senate

    www.flsenate.gov › … › Title XLVI › Chapter 827

    Florida Senate

    Abuse, aggravated abuse, and neglect of a child penalties.  A person who commits aggravated child abuse commits a felony of the first degree, punishable as 

  6. Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect

    https://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/…/define.cfm

    Provides State laws that define the conduct, acts, and omissions that constitute child abuse or neglect that must be reported to child protective agencies.

  7. [PDF]

    Child Abuse Prevention Sourcebook for Florida School Personnel

    www.fldoe.org/ese/pdf/chiabuse.pdf

    Florida Department of Education
    by COF FORM – ‎Related articles

    Recognizing the Abused or Neglected Child .  ……………………………………7. C. Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect .  A. Florida Law on Reporting Child Abuse .

  8. [PDF]

    a professionals guide to child abuse and neglect in florida

    fssjax.org/pdf/FSS-Abuse-prevention.pdf

    the first line of defense against child abuse and neglect. Suspicion on the part of a teacher, school nurse, childcare provider, physician or law enforcement officer 

Learn More


Want to Learn More?  Explore the following websites for different perspectives on child maltreatment.

Topics:  Child Exploitation, Long Term Effects/Consequences, Connections between Domestic Violence and Child Abuse, Domestic Violence, Prevention, and Legal Guardianship

 

1. Innocents Lost by the Miami Herald

2.  Child Exploitation

  • U.S. Department of Justice

http://www.justice.gov/criminal/ceos/

 

3.  Long Term Effects/Consequences

 4.  Recognizing, Preventing, and Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

  • Helpguide

http://www.helpguide.org/mental/child_abuse_physical_emotional_sexual_neglect.htm

 

 

5.  Child Maltreatment and Domestic Violence

  • U.S. Department of Human Services

6.  The Overlap between Child Maltreatment and Domestic Violence

https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals/domesticviolence/domesticviolenceb.cfm

  • National Council on Family Relations

7.  Domestic Violence and Child Abuse – What is the Connection?

http://www.ncfr.org/ncfr-report/focus/child-abuse-neglect/domestic-violence-and-child-abuse what-connection-do-we-know

 8.  Domestic Violence

  • National Hotline:  1-800-799-7233

http://www.thehotline.org/

  • National Coalition against Domestic Violence

http://www.ncadv.org/

  •  Favor House of NW Florida

http://www.favorhouse.org/

 

9.  Prevention

  • Prevention Programs – Effective and Promising

http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/childmaltreatment/prevention.html

10.  Legal Guardianship

  • U.S. Department of Human Services

https://www.childwelfare.gov/permanency/guardianship.cfm

Who We Are


Who we are

Child Guardians, Inc. is a nonprofit organization, 501(C)(3)

Child Guardian Mission Statement

Adopted April 13, 2012

The mission of Child Guardians, Inc. is to help abused, neglected, or abandoned children through its direct funding of children’s needs, and through support of organizations serving these children in the Florida counties of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton.

We pursue our mission by developing and managing our resources, enabling us to: directly fund educational, social, physical, medical, and/or clothing needs of these children; promote community awareness of these children’s needs; and assist with the recruitment, retention and support of volunteers serving these children.

 Board Members

  • Steve Allen
  • Mary Bush
  • Carol Calfee
  • Lillie Fuller
  • Erin Haslag
  • Kaffey Hinds
  • Lee Hinds
  • Sue Markham
  • Tanya Nelson
  • Lori Potts
  • Vicky Schlenker
  • Diane Scott
  •  Wes Shoemaker
  • Carol Calfee
  • Andrea Wallace

Advisory Board Members

  • Lisa Bernau
  • Tammy Dillard
  • Jim Hendricks
  • Sharon Hess-Herrick
  • Diane Gup
  • Philomena Madden
  • Ed Marsch
  • Katherine Teegarden

How To Help

Donate!
Volunteer!
Fundraise!
Legislate!
Shop!

National Resources


Using the resources presented here, educate yourself, and “one child at a time”, assist us in providing funding for the unmet needs of our most vulnerable children.


Contact Us


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News


2014 PCO Golf Tournament


logo_150 for PCO golf

September 26th & September 27th, 2014

Please mark your calendars now and plan to participate in this Premier Charity Golf Event in Pensacola, Florida

PCO Registration 

Click Here to:

  1. Register as a sponsor
  2. Enter your 2 person team
  3. Buy your ticket for the Thursday Night
    Tee-Off-Par-Tee

The Panhandle Charitable Open (PCO) is dedicated to serving the needs of our community with emphasis on elderly care, special needs situations for children and feeding the hungry. The PCO focuses its funding on committed, grass roots organizations that rely strongly on volunteer efforts and where foundation support will make a significant difference. All of the net proceeds from our efforts go directly to local charity.

The success in recent years of the PCO ePanhandle Charitable Opennabled our board to donate over $400,000 to charities such as Child Guardians, Inc., Gulf Coast Kid’s House, Council on Aging of West Florida, ARC Gateway, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northwest Florida, Independence for the Blind, American Cancer Society, and Covenant Hospice. The primary charities for 2014 are Child Guardians, Inc., Council on Aging of West Florida, and Gulf Coast Kid’s House. Increasing the number of charities which participate highlights a goal of the PCO to continue to expand the impact and reach of our golf tournament. The PCO has continued to grow in popularity and success each year.

 

 

 

 

Good Morning!


Just think what it would be like for every child in America (even if they are victims of maltreatment) to wake up feeling this way!

 

http://youtu.be/gMAllbuUkMI

 

Assisting high needs youth in accessing higher education


Check out http://naehcy.org/educational-resources/higher-ed for tip sheets, podcasts, and more. NAEHCY also offers a toll-free helpline to assist young people, and professionals seeking to help young people, in accessing higher education. The helpline information is (855) 446-2673 (toll-free) or highered@naehcy.org Thank you again!

Higher EducationHigher Education

http://naehcy.org

On a regular basis, children and youth report that school is a home to them – a place where they see the same faces, sit in the same seat, and can put their hearts and minds into pursuits that ease their daily troubles.

Understanding Child Neglect


Understanding Why Some Children are Neglected

If you see neglect or abuse call the Florida Abuse Hotline at 800-962-2873, if you see a child in immediate danger call 911.

Neglect is rarely a willful act. Most parents want to be good parents, but have trouble dealing with the STRESS caused by:

1. Emotional Problems. Parents who neglect their children generally have a very poor self-image. Often they were denied love and praise during their own childhoods. Lack of support from relatives, friends and the community combined with possible marital problems may leave parents feeling lonely, isolated, trapped and depressed.

2. Financial Difficulties. Without enough money, daily life can be very stressful. Many parents must struggle just to provide food and clothing for their children. Poor housing conditions, which parents feel powerless to improve, make matters worse. Tensions can continue to build unless parents get the help they need.

3. Limited Parenting Skills. Some neglectful parents are insecure. They know very little about raising children and have no one to turn to for help. Their only role models are their own parents – who may have neglected them. Following their parents’ example means that the vicious cycle of neglect continues.

4. Drug/Alcohol Abuse. Using alcohol or other drugs as an escape only creates more problems. The effects of alcohol or other drugs limit a parent’s ability to properly care for children.

 

Thank you, Knights of Columbus Council 7027


Thank you!

The Knights of Columbus Council 7027 present a check for $7,500 to Child Guardians, Inc.!!    The Board says, “Thank you for including us as a recipient of funds from  the Smokin’ in the Square BBQ Contest!”  100% of the funds are dedicated to meeting the needs of abused, neglected, and abandoned children.

 

APRIL IS CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION MONTH


April is recognized as National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This month is set aside to recognize the ways we can work together — as families, communities and a nation — to reduce the number of children abused by their caregivers. Social service workers across the country try to keep families together while ensuring the child’s safety. Research documents that removing a child from their home is often more traumatic to a child than remaining in home where they are a victim of maltreatment.  Social services and law enforcement agencies around the country have the difficult task of protecting those who cannot protect themselves –  with as little disruption as possible for the child.

Many people do not know that child abuse laws were first brought about as a result of laws against the cruelty to animals. It took until 1974 for the first federal child protection legislation to be passed. The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) has been in effect through our states and tribes since. Child Abuse Prevention Month was first proclaimed for April in 1983 and since has become a national way to bring to light the challenges and solutions to preventing child abuse and neglect.

Join us today in reducing child abuse, neglect, and abandonment, and when we can’t – try to bring a little normalcy to children removed from their homes…”one child at a time.”

Let us Not Forget!


Let us not forget….the children
Join the community in remembering
those children who have been abused,
abandoned, and neglected.

When: Wednesday April 9, 2014

Time : 4:30 pm

Where: Pavilion at South Riverwalk
Willing Street
Milton, FL 32570

“ I am for the child ”

New Video Available


Can you devote 12 minutes to better understand the world of abuse and neglect?  Watch this video!

HTTP://VIMEO.COM/HESCHLE/REMOVED

 

Save the Date!


Smokin’ in the Square
BBQ Contest
March 7 & 8, 2014
Pensacola, Florida